For Professionals, Adults, Retirees

Improvisation

Based on recent work and thinking of Keith Johnstone, participants play games to learn improvisation skills like pleasing their scene partner and staying happy when they fail. For high school, college, & professional performers. Here is a handout for a short improv workshop: NC Thespians 3:22:14

Juggling for Beginners

Juggling Class For adults and children age 9 and up, this juggling workshop features juggling performance pieces that point up the importance of failure as part of learning something new, the value of setting a positive mental attitude to attain success, and the virtue of persistence in achieving goals. Participants learn a basic juggling pattern and some variations, and they learn how to juggle with a friend. This workshop offers a fun way for families to play together and for anyone to improve coordination.

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Body Language and Non-verbal Communication

For students of theater and communication, and anyone who wants to understand what people are saying beyond their words, this workshop breaks down and demonstrates the elements of body language and non-verbal communication. Participants observe and qualify movement in others, learn to bring their unconscious reactions to body language into consciousness, change specific aspects of their own movement, and observe how their feelings and thoughts change as they change their own body language. They learn a variety of pathways to deep listening that lead to establishing rapport with others.

Mime and Movement for Actors

For drama students and professionals, this residency helps them create strong, believable, fully-physicalized characters. Students will experience a variety of physical approaches to character development such as image work, energy work, animals, honing kinesthetic awareness, sharpening focus, developing a physical presence, exploring rhythm and dynamics, and studying and practicing body language principles. Sessions begin with a warm-up, continue with guided physical approaches to character, improvisations based physical explorations, reflections on character discoveries, and end with reflection on learning and growth. By the end of the residency, students have experienced a variety of physical approaches to character and have found one or more physical approaches to characterization that work for them. They will have a sense of how physicalization can strengthen their focus and enlarge their stage presence.

Ms. Kerrigan’s residency was very beneficial and enriching for my 8th grade Movement class. It complemented our unit on gesture and made valid in very obvious ways how vital gesture and expression are to movement and choreography. Sheila presented very well and maintained a good rapport with the students. I was impressed with her clarity, humor and thorough approach to the material.      –Mary Grady Norkus, Durham Academy

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Collaborative Creative Process for Performers

DancersThis residency leads participants through a collaborative creative process from choosing an initial idea and gathering material about it to performing their finished piece. They follow a structure for making progress on the piece. They learn about group dynamics and healthy group practices such as equitable power-sharing and consensus building. They practice giving rigorous, positive critiques and revising their work-in-progress. As people progress from a simple idea to a composition in time and space that communicates intellectually, kinesthetically, and emotionally with an audience, they learn the fundamental, liberating truth that they can create their own worlds with their bodies, voices, and imaginations. This is the power, and the empowerment, inherent in participation in the performing arts.

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