Residency

Devising New Work

In this residency students, with guidance, start from zero and build a performance. They experience and learn: the importance of guideline-setting; multiple techniques for mining for ideas and themes; approaches to agreeing on a theme; crafting a mission and a statement; determining the desired effect on the audience; creating the world; gathering and creating material using various methods in the studio and outside it; tracking and communicating progress; decision-making processes; organizing material; cutting; attending to technical needs; rehearsing, and, finally, performing.

Mime Adds Zip! to Writing

Many young students struggle to write with details and elaboration. Drama activities can spice up writing with vivid details and elaboration that support the main idea of a narrative. In pre-writing exercises, students engage in guided imaginative experiences, act them out using their bodies, and then write about them. Their writing sparkles.

NC CCR ELA W.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

 

Forces and Motion, Science and Dance

How are Dance and Science Standards connected? What can Dance teach us about Science? How can movement help students understand, explain, and remember Science concepts? This residency makes clear connections between dance and science principles like force, motion, gravity, energy, push, pull, mass, and weight. Students investigate and illustrate invisible forces through movement.

What does PUSH feel like?

What does PUSH feel like?

NC Essential Standards: Science 1.P.1 Understand how forces (pushes and pulls) affect the motion of an object. 2.P.1 Understand the relationship between sound and vibrating objects. 3.P.1 Understand motion and factors that affect motion. 4.P.1 Understand how various forces affect the motion of an object. 5.P.1 Understand force, motion, and the relationship between them.
(Sheila loves to work with teachers to connect with other standards, too–contact her!)

 

Speak, Listen, Discuss, and Collaborate with Theatre

The English curriculum requires collaborative discussions in pairs, small groups, and larger groups. This residency teaches the behaviors, methods, and expectations that allow for group discussion and collaboration. Students will experience the basics of effective small group processes while creating a performance based on a text that relates to something they are studying. The text could be an original historical document, a poem or short literary work, a scientific theory, a performance, or something else chosen by the classroom teacher.

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Opinion, Argument, Reasons: Dramatic Exercises to Boost Writing

In this residency, groups of students collaborate to write an argument supported by reasons about something they are studying—for example a current event, a historical event, a work of art, or a scientific theory. They explore the topic dramatically, and then begin writing an argument. They practice reading their argument aloud, (with appropriate volume, clarity, rate, and expression), receive peer responses, revise their writing, and, at the end of the residency perform it for their classmates.

Curricular Connections
English Language Arts Grades 3-5.W.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.  6-8.W.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. NC Theatre Arts 3-8.C.1 Use movement, voice, and writing to communicate ideas and feelings. C.2 Use performance to communicate ideas and feelings. 

 

What Were They Thinking? Exploring Figures from History through Drama

This residency integrates Theater with Language Arts and Social Studies standards. Before the residency, student groups research a figure who played a key role in the history they are studying. During the residency, they explore dramatically and imaginatively their historical figure. Then they write monologues, arguments, or letters in the voice of their key figures that explain their points of view on the events they influenced–for example, in U.S. History, the Revolutionary War or the Civil War. They write about the motivation of historical figures, the obstacles they faced, and their hopes for and influences on the future. They work in collaborative groups to create mini-performances from their writing. Students gain skills and awareness of group dynamics and practice their skills in collaborative creative processes. Finally, students perform their monologues or letters.

Curricular Connections
English Language Arts Grades 3-8.W.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. NC Social Studies 3.H.1.2 Analyze the impact of contributions of diverse historical figures in local communities and regions over time. 4.H.1.3 Explain how people, events, and developments brought about changes to communities in various regions in NC. 5.H.2.1 Summarize the contributions of the “Founding Fathers” to the development of our country.  6.H.2.4 Explain the role that key historical figures and cultural groups had in transforming society.  8.H.2.2 Summarize how leadership and citizen actions (e.g. the founding fathers, the Regulators, the Greensboro Four, and participants of the Wilmington Race Riots) influenced the outcome of key conflicts in N.C. and the U.S. Theatre Arts: 3-8.C.1 Use movement, voice, and writing to communicate ideas and feelings. C.2 Use performance to communicate ideas and feelings.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZW6qnAVEN6Q

 

Communicate! Collaborate! Create! Mime!

Marionette: Leading & Following

“Wow!!” What a fabulous time we all had during your visit to Saluda River. The ways in which you made learning fun as well as meaningful makes such a difference to our students.” –Stephanie Walker, Saluda River Elementary Theatre Arts Teacher.

This residency emphasizes the communication, collaboration, and creative thinking skills inherent in mime. Students, through imaginative movement explorations in pairs and small groups, learn basic skills like: focusing attention on a partner, leading and following and switching from leading and following, making creative choices, working with a partner without bossing, listening, (really!) rotating group roles and responsibilities, and practicing positive critiques of the work of their peers. They conceive, develop, and perform their own mime pieces as they are guided through group collaborative processes.

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Devising Original Performance for Youth At Risk

Create Performance

Especially geared for youth-at-risk and reluctant writers, this residency begins with setting guidelines for behavior together. The group brainstorms and discusses hot topics for a performance. Students write short pieces on topics that are important to them in genres that make sense to them. They collaborate on taking their writings from the page to the stage. If all goes according to plan, the residency culminates in a performance conceived and created by the performers about the issues that keep them awake at night and get them out of bed in the morning.

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Mime and Movement for Actors

For drama students, amateurs, and professionals, this residency or workshop helps  create strong, believable, fully-physicalized characters. Participants experience a variety of physical approaches to character development such as image work, energy work, animals, honing kinesthetic awareness, sharpening focus, developing a presence, exploring rhythm and dynamics, and studying and practicing body language principles. Sessions begin with a warm-up, continue with guided physical approaches to character, improvisation-based physical explorations, reflections on character discoveries, and end with reflection on learning and growth. By the end of the residency, participants  will have a sense of how physicalization can strengthen their focus and enlarge their stage presence.

Ms. Kerrigan’s residency was very beneficial and enriching for my 8th grade Movement class. It complemented our unit on gesture and made valid in very obvious ways how vital gesture and expression are to movement and choreography. Sheila presented very well and maintained a good rapport with the students. I was impressed with her clarity, humor and thorough approach to the material.      –Mary Grady Norkus, Durham Academy

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Collaborative Creative Process for Performers

DancersThis residency leads participants through a collaborative creative process from choosing an initial idea and gathering material about it to performing their finished piece. They follow a structure for making progress on the piece. They learn about group dynamics and healthy group practices such as equitable power-sharing and consensus building. They practice giving rigorous, positive critiques and revising their work-in-progress. As people progress from a simple idea to a composition in time and space that communicates intellectually, kinesthetically, and emotionally with an audience, they learn the fundamental, liberating truth that they can create their own worlds with their bodies, voices, and imaginations. This is the power, and the empowerment, inherent in participation in the performing arts.

National Core Arts Standards: Cr.1 Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. Cr.2 Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. Cr. 3 Refine and complete artistic work. Pr.6.1 Convey meaning through artistic work.

 

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